Strahbary's Fields

A California Girl's Place for all things Geek Chic

Wishlist Wednesday #15 June 18, 2013

Olive Oil Doxie

From Goodreads:

Life is so unfair, and it sends many things to try Professor Dr Moritz-Maria von Igelfeld, author of Portuguese Irregular Verbs and pillar of the Institute of Romance Philology in the proud Bavarian city of Regensburg. There is the undeserved rise of his rival (and owner of a one-legged dachshund), Detlev Amadeus Unterholzer; the interminable ramblings of the librarian, Herr Huber; and the condescension of his colleagues with regard to his unmarried state. But when his friend Ophelia Prinzel takes it upon herself to match-make, and duly produces a cheerful heiress with her own Schloss, it appears that the professor’s true worth is about to be recognized .Maddening, idiotic and hugely entertaining, von Igelfeld is an inspired comic creation.

Why I want to read this:
The cover really just says it all: a one legged wiener dog and olive oil. What more could an Italian wiener dog owning book lover want? This book just sounds whimsical and fun. Just what’s needed for a fun summer escape.

Want to play along? Post your Wishlist Wednesday, add a link to the Pen to Paper Blog. Then go on their website and add a link to your blog. It’s just that simple!

 

Wishlist Wednesday #14 June 12, 2013

Filed under: Wishlist Wednesdays — dianatierney3 @ 10:34 pm
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Austenland

From Goodreads:

Jane Hayes is a seemingly normal young New Yorker, but she has a secret. Her obsession with Mr. Darcy, as played by Colin Firth in the BBC adaptation of Pride and Prejudice, is ruining her love life: no real man can compare. But when a wealthy relative bequeaths her a trip to an English resort catering to Austen-crazed women, Jane’s fantasies of meeting the perfect Regency-era gentleman suddenly become realer than she ever could have imagined.

Decked out in empire-waist gowns, Jane struggles to master Regency etiquette and flirts with gardeners and gentlemen; or maybe even, she suspects, with the actors who are playing them. It’s all a game, Jane knows. And yet the longer she stays, the more her insecurities seem to fall away, and the more she wonders: Is she about to kick the Austen obsession for good, or could all her dreams actually culminate in a Mr. Darcy of her own?

Why I want to read it:
I love all things Jane Austen and have a love for Mr. Darcy as referenced in this Top Ten Post. It’s an interesting take on the obsessions we have and how much it can affect our real lives. Can our fandoms create unrealistic expectations of our real lives? I look forward to exploring that idea in this great little novel.

Interested in playing along? Put a link to  Pen and Paper on your blog and post a link to your Wishlist Wednesday to their blog. It’s really interesting to see what other people’s Wishlist Wednesday’s are!

 

Wishlist Wednesday #13 June 5, 2013

Filed under: Wishlist Wednesdays — dianatierney3 @ 9:13 pm
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Keeping up with my Time Travel theme this week’s Wishlist Wednesday is:

shining girls

THE GIRL WHO WOULDN’T DIE HUNTS THE KILLER WHO SHOULDN’T EXIST.

From Goodreads:

The future is not as loud as war, but it is relentless. It has a terrible fury all its own.”

Harper Curtis is a killer who stepped out of the past. Kirby Mazrachi is the girl who was never meant to have a future.

Kirby is the last shining girl, one of the bright young women, burning with potential, whose lives Harper is destined to snuff out after he stumbles on a House in Depression-era Chicago that opens on to other times.

At the urging of the House, Harper inserts himself into the lives of the shining girls, waiting for the perfect moment to strike. He’s the ultimate hunter, vanishing into another time after each murder, untraceable-until one of his victims survives.

Determined to bring her would-be killer to justice, Kirby joins the Chicago Sun-Times to work with the ex-homicide reporter, Dan Velasquez, who covered her case. Soon Kirby finds herself closing in on the impossible truth . . .

THE SHINING GIRLS is a masterful twist on the serial killer tale: a violent quantum leap featuring a memorable and appealing heroine in pursuit of a deadly criminal.

Why I want to read it:

Ok Time Travel aside, it’s a fresh take on the whole serial killer murder mystery troupe. We can’t deny the fact that if we had the ability to time travel there would be those of us that would take the opportunity to change events and or kill certain people. I am excited to read a book that explores the darker side of Time Travel.

Interested in playing along? Put a link to Pen and Paper (our host) on your blog and post a link to your Wishlist Wednesday to their blog. It’s really interesting to see what other people’s Wishlist Wednesday’s are!

 

Wishlist Wednesday #12 May 21, 2013

Filed under: Wishlist Wednesdays — dianatierney3 @ 11:15 pm
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Ready player

For years, millions have struggled fruitlessly to attain this prize, knowing only that Halliday’s riddles are based in the pop culture he loved–that of the late twentieth century. And for years, millions have found in this quest another means of escape, retreating into happy, obsessive study of Halliday’s icons. Like many of his contemporaries, Wade is as comfortable debating the finer points of John Hughes’s oeuvre, playing Pac-Man, or reciting Devo lyrics as he is scrounging power to run his OASIS rig.

And then Wade stumbles upon the first puzzle.

Suddenly the whole world is watching, and thousands of competitors join the hunt–among them certain powerful players who are willing to commit very real murder to beat Wade to this prize. Now the only way for Wade to survive and preserve everything he knows is to win. But to do so, he may have to leave behind his oh-so-perfect virtual existence and face up to life–and love–in the real world he’s always been so desperate to escape.

A world at stake.
A quest for the ultimate prize.
Are you ready?

Why I want to read this:

I just recently watched the Xbox One reveal. And thought the technology is really awesome it made me think of this book. The gaming engineers were telling the audience that they were blurring the lines between reality and the gaming world. One can’t help but think that will the above scenario actually happen? It has all the makings of really great science fiction and I am just dyeing to read it.

Interested in playing along? Put a link to Pen and Paper (our host) on your blog and post a link to your Wishlist Wednesday to their blog. It’s really interesting to see what other people’s Wishlist Wednesday’s are!

 

Wishlist Wednesday #11: The Kingmakers Daugther May 15, 2013

Filed under: Wishlist Wednesdays — dianatierney3 @ 10:25 pm
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Kingmakers daughter

This week’s Wishlist Wednesday is an impulse buy. I stepped into Barnes and Noble to pick up a journal for my garden and Cooked by Michael Pollan and came across this just lying on a table.  How could I not pick it up?

 

From Goodreads:

Spies, poison, and curses surround her…

Is there anyone she can trust?

The Kingmaker’s Daughter is the gripping story of the daughters of the man known as the “Kingmaker,” Richard Neville, Earl of Warwick: the most powerful magnate in fifteenth-century England. Without a son and heir, he uses his daughters, Anne and Isabel as pawns in his political games, and they grow up to be influential players in their own right. In this novel, her first sister story since The Other Boleyn Girl, Philippa Gregory explores the lives of two fascinating young women.

At the court of Edward IV and his beautiful queen, Elizabeth Woodville, Anne grows from a delightful child to become ever more fearful and desperate when her father makes war on his former friends. Married at age fourteen, she is soon left widowed and fatherless, her mother in sanctuary and her sister married to the enemy. Anne manages her own escape by marrying Richard, Duke of Gloucester, but her choice will set her on a collision course with the overwhelming power of the royal family and will cost the lives of those she loves most in the world, including her precious only son, Prince Edward. Ultimately, the kingmaker’s daughter will achieve her father’s greatest ambition.

 

Why I want to read it:

Well for starters it’s Phillipa Gregory, she is one of my favorite historical fiction novelists. There is so much lore around Richard Neville. I have read him as a supporting character in a number of other books. I can’t wait to see him through his daughter’s eyes.

 

Wishlist Wednesday #10: Cooked By Michael Pollan May 8, 2013

Filed under: Wishlist Wednesdays — dianatierney3 @ 12:49 pm
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This week’s Wishlist Wednesday is another foodie book, “Cooked” by Michael Pollan.

Cooked

From Amazon:

“Because of the power of his prose and his reasoning, Cooked may prove to be just as influential as Pollan’s seminal book, The Omnivore’s Dilemma…” — The Washington Post

In Cooked, Michael Pollan explores the previously uncharted territory of his own kitchen. Here, he discovers the enduring power of the four classical elements—fire, water, air, and earth—to transform the stuff of nature into delicious things to eat and drink. Apprenticing himself to a succession of culinary masters, Pollan learns how to grill with fire, cook with liquid, bake bread, and ferment everything from cheese to beer. In the course of his journey, he discovers that the cook occupies a special place in the world, standing squarely between nature and culture. Both realms are transformed by cooking, and so, in the process, is the cook.

Each section of Cooked tracks Pollan’s effort to master a single classic recipe using one of the four elements. A North Carolina barbecue pit master tutors him in the primal magic of fire; a Chez Panisse–trained cook schools him in the art of braising; a celebrated baker teaches him how air transforms grain and water into a fragrant loaf of bread; and finally, several mad-genius “fermentos” (a tribe that includes brewers, cheese makers, and all kinds of picklers) reveal how fungi and bacteria can perform the most amazing alchemies of all. The reader learns alongside Pollan, but the lessons move beyond the practical to become an investigation of how cooking involves us in a web of social and ecological relationships: with plants and animals, the soil, farmers, our history and culture, and, of course, the people our cooking nourishes and delights. Cooking, above all, connects us.

The effects of not cooking are similarly far reaching. Relying upon corporations to process our food means we consume large quantities of fat, sugar, and salt; disrupt an essential link to the natural world; and weaken our relationships with family and friends. In fact, Cooked argues, taking back control of cooking may be the single most important step anyone can take to help make the American food system healthier and more sustainable. Reclaiming cooking as an act of enjoyment and self-reliance, learning to perform the magic of these everyday transformations, opens the door to a more nourishing life.

 

Why I want to read this:

I have yet to read any of his books yet. Food Inc. was influential in my current food philosophy. As far as this book is concerned, I have heard a lot of press. Either people love the book or they have some harsh criticisms. Also, the question of the day regarding Michael Pollan is: Is he sexist?

I am looking forward to formulating my own opinion of the book along with answering some of the questions put forth…

 

Wishlist Wednesday #9 May 1, 2013

Filed under: Wishlist Wednesdays — dianatierney3 @ 12:42 pm

Divergent

 

From Goodreads:

In Beatrice Prior’s dystopian Chicago world, society is divided into five factions, each dedicated to the cultivation of a particular virtue–Candor (the honest), Abnegation (the selfless), Dauntless (the brave), Amity (the peaceful), and Erudite (the intelligent). On an appointed day of every year, all sixteen-year-olds must select the faction to which they will devote the rest of their lives. For Beatrice, the decision is between staying with her family and being who she really is–she can’t have both. So she makes a choice that surprises everyone, including herself.

During the highly competitive initiation that follows, Beatrice renames herself Tris and struggles alongside her fellow initiates to live out the choice they have made. Together they must undergo extreme physical tests of endurance and intense psychological simulations, some with devastating consequences. As initiation transforms them all, Tris must determine who her friends really are–and where, exactly, a romance with a sometimes fascinating, sometimes exasperating boy fits into the life she’s chosen. But Tris also has a secret, one she’s kept hidden from everyone because she’s been warned it can mean death. And as she discovers unrest and growing conflict that threaten to unravel her seemingly perfect society, she also learns that her secret might help her save those she loves . . . or it might destroy her.

 

Why I want to read it:

When you get a text around midnight from a friend saying “OMG I am reading the best book you need to start reading this.” which was followed by another text about a week later, at roughly one in the morning saying “Oh crap, shit just hit the fan. Why aren’t you reading this yet?” one’s interest is most certainly peaked.

This book seems like a cross between Harry Potter and The Hunger Games which is just the right combination for me. Plus when one is tagged in a facebook post with another “subtle” push to read the book from Michele (who has almost the same taste in books as I do) is to determine how far up on my to-read list this book should be bumped up to.